Changing Sights is Not Always Hard

Taurus USA’s move to Georgia late last year has been somewhat eclipsed by the new product offerings coming from the company- There was the TX22, a .22 caliber handgun that mimics a typical 9mm carry gun in many ways, the G3 and now their latest offering the G3c, which is a down-sized G3. In many ways it mimics the ever-popular G2. The two guns are sized identically, but the G3c has a few cosmetic changes. I’d done a write-up for it that will appear in a GUNS Magazine future issue and it’s currently well-covered in YouTube channels so my purpose here isn’t to tell you about the gun.

Taurus G3c
The new Taurus G3c

If you’re a Taurus fan, you’ll likely buy one and if you do, you may find yourself looking at the sights like I did and thinking, I need something better. One of the press releases accompanying the PR announcing the G3c was from TRUGLO announcing that some of their existing sights were compatible with the G3c. I went to Amazon and searched for one of the models the PR mentioned, tritium night sights with a big orange dot surrounding the tritium on the front sight. My eyes are such I need help so these sights seemed to be just the ticket.

It was about 9:30 on a Saturday night when I placed the Amazon order. The sights showed up at my house the next day (Sunday) around 4:00 in the afternoon. Say what you will, but that impressed me for two reasons: 1) Amazon had them in stock and 2) Weekend delivery is treated the same as weekday delivery for Amazon. Remember when you get ready to bash Amazon for being liberal (I don’t know if they are or are not), they have lots of gun stuff.

TRITIUM PRO Night Sights (Orange)
TRUGLO Tritium Night Sights

A recommended product along with the sights was a small tool for removing and installing Glock front sights. The literature with the Taurus indicated the sights on the G3c were designed to be replaced by aftermarket sights compatible with Glocks, so I bought the tool. Together, sights and the tool, the total cost was around $80. The Glock tool came in handy, making the sight change project straight forward. Here is the results:

If you’re not familiar with the Taurus G2/G3 products, I suggest you take a look at them whenever product is back in the gun stores. These guns sell for half what a corresponding Glock costs and they do the same job. I’m a little prejudice toward the Taurus pistols I admit. My first semi-auto pistol was a Taurus and I’ve owned several since. They shoot well, I’ve never had any issues with any of them, and this newest offering keeps up the tradition of offering a quality gun backed by a lifetime warranty at a working man or woman’s price.

Sometimes One Holster Will Work for a Variety of Guns

Most people I know who have been around handguns for long, especially those committed to daily carry, admit to having a drawer (or drawers) filled with holsters they’ve tried but just weren’t up to their expectations. I’ve got a different story! Being fortunate enough to have acquired a number of excellent handguns, any one of which are suitable for a daily carry gun, I feel guilty if I don’t rotate them some.

crossbreed1For me, having a bunch of guns has not equaled having a bunch of holsters. Guess I’ve just been lucky and chosen well up front. My first concealed carry holster was a Crossbreed SuperTuck, purchased a little more than eight years ago for a Taurus 24/7. There it is right there, with that original 24/7 in it. It has held up well.

The Taurus got replaced with a Beretta PX-4 Storm 9mm. Okay, not replaced as in traded. I kept the Taurus, but carried the Storm a while. It fit the same holster, just fine. Then I got a Springfield XDm .45 ACP and was pleasantly surprised to find it worked in that same Crossbreed Holster. So did a Smith & Wesson M&P and a FNX 40 and a Sig P226.

bullard1When we started carrying D.M. Bullard Leather Holsters in our store, I figured I’d give the local company a try. I’d become a 1911 person by then so I got one of their 1911 holsters for a 5 inch gun with a rail. Works fine with my Colt and Springfield 1911s, but it also works fine with any of the 4.25 inch barrelled 1911 Commanders.

I liked that holster so much I decided to get one for my double stack 9s and 40s, but hmm, let’s see, which one. The biggest and heaviest of the bunch was a Sig P226, so I ordered a custom D.M. Bullard leather holster custom made for a Sig P226. It was no surprise that it also fit the Sig P229, but guess what else fits in that holster?bullardmix

That original Taurus 24/7 fits it. The Springfield XDm fits it, All of my M&Ps (9, 40 and 45) fit it. The FNX-40 fits it. The gun you see in it here is a CZ-P07. They all fit with what’s commonly called Level 1 retention. That’s enough friction to hold the gun snugly in the holster so there is no danger in it falling out as you move about. These guns a all draw easily from the holster, as well.

So don’t go getting all antsy about having to have a bunch of holsters on hand if you want to grow your gun collection. Get a custom holster for something like the Sig P226 and chances are it will work just fine for many of the other guns you may want to try that are of similar size and capability.

Tell you a secret. I’ve been known to carry a 1911 Commander in my D.M. Bullard Sig P226 holster without realizing I’d put on the wrong holster that morning. Heck I might could have gotten by with just one of their wonderful holsters! Just kidding. The 1911, being a single stack, was just a little loose, if I’m honest about it.

The Crossbreed Super Tuck – a Holster that Works Well for Me

By David Freeman

I’ve read a number of comments from magazine writers and bloggers about having a “drawer full of holsters” most of which were accumulated while trying to find one that works best for them as a concealed carry rig. Sometimes it’s a function of different holsters for different clothing. I’m very fortunate. The first holster I tried after obtaining my Concealed Handgun License worked perfectly for my needs and continues to do so.

I stumbled across the Crossbreed SuperTuck in a few forums and decided to try one. My initial carry gun was a Sig Sauer SP2022 and I ordered the holster to fit that gun. It also fit my Taurus 24/7 very nicely, though not contoured for it and was workable for the Beretta PX-4 Storm that I like to carry on occasion.

My son, who is a lot thinner than I am doesn’t have the same luck with his Crossbreed which he uses to carry a Stoeger Cougar 8000. The other night we were going out to dinner and he watched me pick up my rig and stuff it in my pants ready to walk out the door in about 20 seconds. He said it wasn’t that easy for him.

I wear my rig at about 2:45. Rarely do I wear tuckable shirts. Banded bottom knits work best for me. If I wear a shirt with a tucked in tail, I almost always wear the gun outside it and a vest over it. Here are a few photos showing my rig in action:

Supertuck with Taurus 24/7
This shot with the shirt lifted shows how the rig fits in my pants along

Crossbreed Supertuck tucked.
Same seated position with the shirt pulled down

Supertuck not visible at all.
Here I am standing with a different shirt. The gun isnt visible at all.

Heres how the gun rides at this position. I simply lifted the shirt to show you.

Heres my well-worn Super Tuck. The Gun is a 45 Caliber Taurus PT 24/7. Dont tell the SuperTuck folks, who like to customize a rig for every gun, but I use this same rig for my Sig SP2022 and my Beretta PX-4 Storm. It fits the Sig perfectly, in fact, was probably made for it rather than the Taurus.

This heavy duty gun belt from Crossbreed turned out to be a necessity for me. I tried the holster for a month or two with regular belts because I didnt want to spring for the gun belt. Its a waste of time. Get the gun belt, if youre staking your life on having a proper carry rig.

Taurus 24/7 DS – 45 ACP

By David Freeman

Taurus 24/7 45 ACPI grew up shooting revolvers. The first semi-automatic hangun I owned was a Stoeger Cougar 8000 in 9mm. It was a sweet handling and shooting gun. My son liked it and I had been eyeing a Taurus 24/7, so I sold him the Cougar (at least it’s still in the family) and picked up a 9mm Taurus 24/7 at Academy Sports.

The gun was winner from day one. No jams, no misfires and right on target. Plus the trigger was nice and smooth and easy. Since I was getting the gun bug, I soon bought a Sig Sauer SP2022 (it’s a Sig, right?) on sale at Cheaper Than Dirt for a really great price. You can read about that gun elsewhere in my blog, as well as the Beretta PX-4 Storm. Here I was with three 9mm semi-automatics (one to carry, one for the truck and one for the upstairs bedroom was my argument). I carried the Storm, kept the Taurus in the truck and the Sig upstairs. But on range day, I carried all three. Even though the Taurus was the least expensive of the three and the one from the company that has to fight against a bad rap from years gone by, it was the most fun to shoot and at least as accurate as the other, two, if not more so.

Because I had so much invested in 9mm pistols and had good supply of ammunition, I tended to resist the magazine articles and instructor admonitions that for defensive carry, a 45 is better. It was while attending the NRA Handgun Instructor Course that it finally dawned on me. It wasn’t that I couldn’t effectively stop a bad guy with my 9mm. It was more about who else I might endanger while doing so. The instructor explained quite graphically, that even with hollow point ammunition, because of it’s muzzle velocity, a 9mm will shoot through things, including people and possibly hit innocents, even if they’re behind a wall.

I sold the 9mm Taurus 24/7 and bought the 45 ACP version of what I thought was the same gun. It looks the same. It feels the same, even weighs about the same. It carries well. I loaded it up with some 230 grain hollow point ammunition and felt safe. Until I went to the range. Bang – jam. Bang – jam. Over and over.  I took the gun home, cleaned it really well and tried it again. I got as much as a bang, bang jam out of it this time. I tried different ammo and discovered I could shoot FMJ (full metal jacket, also known as “ball”) ammo through it without jamming.

It seemed at first it was a magazine problem. Taurus offered to send me a new one if I sent in the bad one, but I felt a little more testing was in order. I tried three different brands of 225-230 grain hollow point ammo:  Winchester Supreme Elite, MagTech Gold and Remington Golden Sabre. None of them fed without jamming. They did what gun people call “nosediving” where the nose of the cartridge doesn’t slide up the ramp into the chamber like it’s supposed to.

Most gun guys caution that it takes from 300 to 500 rounds to “break in” a new semi-automatic handgun. That wasn’t true with my 9mm Taurus. It was perfect right out of the box. But I after shooting 300 or so expensive rounds through the Taurus 45, it wasn’t getting any better.

I made another stop at Cheaper Than Dirt and picked up two types of 185 grain JHP (jacketed hollow point) — Black Hills and Speer Gold Dot. Problem solved. I may try some other brands later, but for now, I’m satisified that my 45 will perform when and if called upon in a defensive situation.

Oh, and it is pretty accurate. What misses is my fault, not the gun’s. Here’s an example:

Targets 04172010

UPDATE MAY 2016:

One of my mentors suggested trying Winchester Silvertip 185 Grain jacketed hollow points in the Taurus 45. After shooting two boxes of that ammunition with no failures I discovered that for this particular gun the break-in rule appeared to be real. It shoots anything and everything I feed it now with no problems whatsoever. Now that I’ve discovered the Ruger/Polycase ARX rounds, this .45 ACP Taurus 24/7 makes a nice addition to my carry gun rotation. I know many people opt for carrying the same gun all the time, but I like to vary my carry guns to justify having a “collection of them” (just kidding). The real reason is so that I have a broad experience from which to provide advice and guidance to the many students that come through our classes.